published Monday, August 27th, 2012

Website takes 'Bad dog!' to a whole new level

They may look sad and remorseful, but it's doubtful the public shaming will change their mischievous ways. They are the dogs and cats whose mugs are posted on dog-shaming.com, a website started on a lark that has exploded in popularity.

There's a dog who chases the mail carrier. Another who hides meat in the couch.

"We killed a mockingbird," reads a sign posted by two pitiful-looking terriers.

"I ate all the string cheese," notes a sign propped up against a ticked-off-looking black cat.

Anyone can submit their pet's photo and a caption detailing its sins, as long as the sign is spelled properly and the photo contains "no dead things," such as mice or birds, according to the website.

The Tumblr website, recently highlighted on dailymail.co.uk, has gone viral on Facebook, Twitter and other social media. Its popularity has caught dog-shaming.com founder Chris Mohney, editorial director at Tumblr, off-guard, according to reports.

His website, chrismoh ney.tumblr.com, shows a photo of him holding a sign reading: "I just want my life back."

Mohney recently posted, "What seemed like a fun idea for a weekend of dog-shaming humor has turned into a cultural phenomenon that, sadly, I have neither the time nor inclination to pursue all the dang time. Still it would be unjust -- shameful really -- not to let dog-shaming blossom to its fullest flower, so I'm handing the keys over to someone else who can give this blog the attention it deserves."

Mohney said he had at least 200 photos of dogs waiting to be reviewed before posting.

"Many thanks to all the people who sent in their dogs to be shamed and, rest assured, they will get theirs," he said.

about Karen Nazor Hill...

Feature writer Karen Nazor Hill covers fashion, design, home and gardening, pets, entertainment, human interest features and more. She also is an occasional news reporter and the Town Talk columnist. She previously worked for the Catholic newspaper Tennessee Register and was a reporter at the Chattanooga Free Press from 1985 to 1999, when the newspaper merged with the Chattanooga Times. She won a Society of Professional Journalists Golden Press third-place award in feature writing for ...

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