published Sunday, November 25th, 2012

Georgia shatters season scoring record

Georgia running back Todd Gurley (3) works the field against Georgia Tech during an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, in Athens, Ga.
Georgia running back Todd Gurley (3) works the field against Georgia Tech during an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, in Athens, Ga.
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press.

ATHENS, Ga. — Georgia's offense topped the 40-point mark for the seventh time this season Saturday at Sanford Stadium, and in the process set a school record for points in a season.

In the No. 3 Bulldogs' 42-10 rout of Georgia Tech, a Keith Marshall 17-yard touchdown run in the third quarter pushed Georgia past the old scoring record of 450 points, set over 14 games in 2002. Georgia finished the 2012 regular season with 456 points and still has two games remaining.

"I feel like we're just executing, and it's fun when you execute," said Marshall, who rushed for 66 yards and two touchdowns.

Georgia offensive coordinator Mike Bobo said he came into Saturday's game intent on being aggressive against Tech, which doesn't allow its opponents many possessions. Instead of treating each possession like a precious gem, Georgia went looking for big plays.

"We kind of went the other route and said we want to speed it up and keep them on their heels," Bobo said. "I didn't want to slow down our offense; I just wanted to get points on the board."

The Bulldogs failed to score 29 or more points in just two of their 12 games, the 35-7 loss at South Carolina and the 17-9 win over Florida.

More records

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray completed 14 of 17 passes for 215 yards and two touchdowns. On the Dogs' opening drive, Murray passed the 3,000-yard mark for the season and became the first player in SEC history to throw for 3,000 yards or more in three straight seasons.

Murray was not made available for postgame interviews, but Bobo said the quarterback did just about everything right Saturday.

Safety Bacarri Rambo tied a record held by a Georgia legend when he intercepted a pass in the second quarter. It was the senior's 16th of his career, tying him with College Football Hall of Famer Jake Scott.

Career bests

Linebacker Alec Ogletree had plenty of opportunities to show off his speed. The junior had a game- and career-high 15 tackles, with many of them coming on runs to the outside.

"We got to play against [the triple option] last week [against Georgia Southern], and that helped us out a lot," Ogletree said.

That might have helped, but Georgia head coach Mark Richt said Ogletree's speed was the key.

"For him to be able to fly like he can fly, it's just hard for them to get the edge," Richt said.

Senior linebacker Christain Robinson, who made his second straight start, had a career-high 13 tackles. Senior nose tackle John Jenkins also had a career day with 11 tackles.

Extra points

Georgia backup tight end Jay Rome caught his first career touchdown pass, a 24-yarder in the third quarter. ... Georgia Tech ran 88 plays to 49 for the Bulldogs, but the Dogs averaged 7.7 yards per play to 4.8 for Tech. ... Malcolm Mitchell led Georgia's receivers with three catches for 88 yards, including a 57-yarder.

about John Frierson...

John Frierson is in his seventh year at the Times Free Press and seventh year covering University of Tennessee at Chattanooga athletics. The bulk of his time is spent covering Mocs football, but he also writes about women’s basketball and the big-picture issues and news involving the athletic department. A native of Athens, Ga., John grew up a few hundred yards from the University of Georgia campus. Instead of becoming a Bulldog he attended Ole ...

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