published Thursday, December 12th, 2013

'12 Years,' 'Hustle' lead Globes Globes film nominations; HBO leads TV categories

This image released by Fox Searchlight shows Chiwetel Ejiofor, center, in a scene from "12 Years A Slave."
This image released by Fox Searchlight shows Chiwetel Ejiofor, center, in a scene from "12 Years A Slave."
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press.

THE NOMINEES

Nominees for the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards, announced Thursday in Beverly Hills, Calif., by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association:

MOTION PICTURES

• Picture, Drama: "12 Years a Slave," ''Captain Phillips," ''Gravity," ''Philomena," ''Rush."

• Picture, Musical or Comedy: "American Hustle," ''Her," ''Inside Llewyn Davis," ''Nebraska," ''The Wolf of Wall Street."

• Actor, Drama: Chiwetel Ejiofor, "12 Years a Slave"; Idris Elba, "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom"; Tom Hanks, "Captain Phillips"; Matthew McConaughey, "Dallas Buyers Club"; Robert Redford, "All Is Lost."

• Actress, Drama: Cate Blanchett, "Blue Jasmine"; Sandra Bullock, "Gravity"; Judi Dench, "Philomena"; Emma Thompson, "Saving Mr. Banks"; Kate Winslet, "Labor Day."

• Director: Alfonso Cuaron, "Gravity"; Paul Greengrass, "Captain Phillips"; Steve McQueen, "12 Years a Slave"; Alexander Payne, "Nebraska"; David O. Russell, "American Hustle."

• Actor, Musical or Comedy: Christian Bale, "American Hustle"; Bruce Dern, "Nebraska"; Leonardo DiCaprio, "The Wolf of Wall Street"; Oscar Isaac, "Inside Llewyn Davis"; Joaquin Phoenix, "Her."

• Actress, Musical or Comedy: Amy Adams, "American Hustle"; Julie Delpy, "Before Midnight"; Greta Gerwig, "Frances Ha"; Julia Louis-Dreyfus, "Enough Said"; Meryl Streep, "August: Osage County."

• Supporting Actor: Barkhad Abdi, "Captain Phillips"; Daniel Bruhl, "Rush"; Bradley Cooper, "American Hustle"; Michael Fassbender, "12 Years a Slave"; Jared Leto, "Dallas Buyers Club."

• Supporting Actress: Sally Hawkins, "Blue Jasmine"; Jennifer Lawrence, "American Hustle"; Lupita Nyong'o, "12 Years a Slave"; Julia Roberts, "August: Osage County"; June Squibb, "Nebraska."

• Foreign Language: "Blue Is the Warmest Color," ''The Great Beauty," ''The Hunt," ''The Past," ''The Wind Rises."

• Animated Film: "The Croods," ''Despicable Me 2," ''Frozen."

• Screenplay: Spike Jonze, "Her"; Bob Nelson, "Nebraska"; Jeff Pope and Steve Coogan, "Philomena"; John Ridley, "12 Years a Slave"; Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell, "American Hustle."

• Original Score: Alex Ebert, "All Is Lost"; Alex Heffes, "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom"; Steven Price, "Gravity"; John Williams, "The Book Thief"; Hans Zimmer, "12 Years a Slave."

• Original Song: "Atlas" (music and lyrics by Chris Martin, Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland and Will Champion), "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire"; "Let it Go" (music and lyrics by Kristen Anderson Lopez and Robert Lopez), "Frozen"; "Ordinary Love" (music by Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jr. and Brian Burton, lyrics by Bono), "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom"; "Please Mr. Kennedy" (music and lyrics by Ed Rush, George Cromarty, T Bone Burnett, Justin Timberlake, Joel Coen and Ethan Coen), "Inside Llewyn Davis"; "Sweeter Than Fiction" (music and lyrics by Taylor Swift and Jack Antonoff), "One Chance."

TELEVISION

• Series, Drama: "Breaking Bad," ''Downton Abbey," ''The Good Wife," ''House of Cards," ''Masters of Sex."

• Actor, Drama: Bryan Cranston, "Breaking Bad"; Liev Schreiber, "Ray Donovan"; Michael Sheen, "Masters of Sex"; Kevin Spacey, "House of Cards."

• Actress, Drama: Julianna Margulies, "The Good Wife"; Tatiana Maslany, "Orphan Black"; Taylor Schilling, "Orange Is the New Black"; Kerry Washington, "Scandal"; Robin Wright, "House of Cards."

• Series, Musical or Comedy: "The Big Bang Theory," ''Brooklyn Nine-Nine," ''Girls," ''Modern Family," ''Parks and Recreation."

• Actress, Musical or Comedy: Zooey Deschanel, "New Girl"; Lena Dunham, "Girls"; Edie Falco, "Nurse Jackie"; Julia Louis-Dreyfus, "Veep"; Amy Poehler, "Parks and Recreation."

• Actor, Musical or Comedy: Jason Bateman, "Arrested Development"; Don Cheadle, "House of Lies"; Michael J. Fox, "The Michael J. Fox Show"; Jim Parsons, "The Big Bang Theory"; Andy Samberg, "Brooklyn Nine-Nine."

• Miniseries or Movie: "American Horror Story: Coven," ''Behind the Candelabra," ''Dancing on the Edge," ''Top of the Lake," ''White Queen."

• Actress, Miniseries or Movie: Helena Bonham Carter, "Burton and Taylor"; Rebecca Ferguson, "White Queen"; Jessica Lange, "American Horror Story: Coven"; Helen Mirren, "Phil Spector"; Elisabeth Moss, "Top of the Lake."

• Actor, Miniseries or Movie: Matt Damon, "Behind the Candelabra"; Michael Douglas, "Behind the Candelabra"; Chiwetel Ejiofor, "Dancing on the Edge"; Idris Elba, "Luther"; Al Pacino, "Phil Spector."

• Supporting Actress, Series, Miniseries or Movie: Jacqueline Bisset, "Dancing on the Edge"; Janet McTeer, "White Queen"; Hayden Panettiere, "Nashville"; Monica Potter, "Parenthood"; Sofia Vergara, "Modern Family."

• Supporting Actor, Series, Miniseries or Movie: Josh Charles, "The Good Wife"; Rob Lowe, "Behind the Candelabra"; Aaron Paul, "Breaking Bad"; Corey Stoll, "House of Cards"; Jon Voight, "Ray Donovan."

Previously announced:

• Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award: Woody Allen.

  • photo
    This film image released by HBO shows Michael Douglas, left, as Liberace and Matt Damon as Scott Thorson in a scene from "Behind the Candelabra."
    Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press.

The searing historical epic "12 Years a Slave" and the con-artist caper "American Hustle" lead the 71st annual Golden Globes with seven nominations each.

The nominations announced Thursday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif., by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association suggested "American Hustle" and "12 Years a Slave" — one outlandish and farcical, the other grimly accurate — may be this year's Oscar favorites.

Hailed by critics as the movies' most unblinking portrait of slavery, "12 Years a Slave" verified its front-runner status with nominations including best film drama, Chiwetel Ejiofor for best actor in a drama, Steve McQueen for best director and Michael Fassbender and Lupita Nyong'o for their supporting roles.

"All of these nominations hopefully mean that more people will go and see it and that is really exciting because I feel this film is pivotal and just so good for the world," said Nyong'o.

"American Hustle" dominated on the Globes' other category side: comedy or musical. The fictionalized story of the FBI's Abscam investigation amid the disco 1970s earned nominations for best movie comedy and David O. Russell for best director. Much of its starry cast received nominations, including lead actors Christian Bale and Amy Adams, as well as last year's Oscar darling, Jennifer Lawrence for best supporting actress.

Also in the mix are Alexander Payne's father-son road trip "Nebraska," with five nominations, including best actor for Bruce Dern. The space odyssey "Gravity" earned four nominations, as did the Somali pirate thriller "Captain Phillips," starring Tom Hanks as the kidnapped cargo ship captain.

Alfonso Cuaron's innovative 3-D spectacle "Gravity," for which star Sandra Bullock received a best actress nomination, should be a bigger Oscar heavyweight at the Academy Awards, which honor technical categories that the Globes don't. With more than $630 million in worldwide box office, "Gravity" also figures to be the populist favorite.

This year's comedy competition — usually a mixed bag compared to the dramatic categories — could be the strongest field ever for the Globes. Aside from "American Hustle," the group includes Martin Scorsese's "The Wolf of Wall Street," Alexander Payne's "Nebraska," Spike Jonze's "Her" and the Coen brothers' "Inside Llewyn Davis."

The soulful futuristic romance "Her" and '60s Greenwich Village folk tale "Inside Llewyn Davis" both reaped three nominations, including nods for its stars: newcomer Oscar Isaac for "Llewyn Davis" and Joaquin Phoenix for "Her."

The last film of 2013 to screen, Scorsese's three-hour financial industry extravaganza had been one of the biggest question marks this awards season. After being snubbed Wednesday by the Screen Actors Guild Awards nominations, it earned a nomination for Leonardo DiCaprio's performance as an out-of-control Wall Street trader, along with the best picture nomination.

The 77-year-old Dern rounds out best actor in a comedy for his performance as a taciturn Montana man who believes he's won a mailing sweepstakes. He's joined on the dramatic best actor side by another 77-year-old veteran, Robert Redford, who had surprisingly been overlooked by the Screen Actors. The actor, who hasn't ever won an acting Oscar, was nominated by the Globes for his nearly unspoken performance as a man shipwrecked in the Indian Ocean in "All Is Lost."

In the dramatic best picture category, "12 Years a Slave" was joined by "Captain Phillips," ''Gravity," ''Philomena" and "Rush." Most notably shutout was "Lee Daniels' The Butler," the Civil Rights history told through a long-serving White House butler played by Forest Whitaker.

This year's Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award will be given to Woody Allen, who, long a absentee from award shows, isn't expected to attend. His latest film "Blue Jasmine," a portrait of a bitter, fallen socialite played by Cate Blanchett, won nominations Thursday for Blanchett and Sally Hawkins.

Among the surprises were a few nominees for best actress in a comedy. Julie Delpy was nominated for her performance in the romance "Before Midnight," the third film in Richard Linklater's series. And Greta Gerwig received a nod for "Frances Ha," the black-and-white story of a young, meandering New York dancer.

Disney's making-of "Mary Poppins" tale "Saving Mr. Banks," a possible Oscar contender, fared poorly Thursday, earning only a nomination for Emma Thompson's lead performance as "Poppins" author P.L. Travers. While the Texas HIV drama "Dallas Buyers Club" was rewarded with expected nominations for Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto, it failed to land any others.

McConaughey, Redford and Ejiofor are joined in best actor by Tom Hanks for "Captain Phillips" and Idris Elba, who plays the late Nelson Mandela in "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom."

HBO leads in TV nominations

HBO led all television networks with nine Golden Globe nominations on Thursday while Netflix, which didn't exist as an original programming source until February, snagged six nominations — more than stalwarts ABC, CBS and NBC.

Starz and Showtime also had six nominations each.

The Golden Globes set up a potential victory lap for the well-regarded final season of "Breaking Bad," which was nominated for best drama series and earned Bryan Cranston a nod for best actor. After sweeping the drama awards earlier this year, Showtime's "Homeland" was shut out for the major awards.

High-profile actors in HBO movies about music figures earned some notice from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Michael Douglas and Matt Damon were both nominated for best TV movie actor for their roles in "Behind the Candelabra," and Rob Lowe had a supporting actor nod. Al Pacino earned an acting nomination for playing music producer Phil Spector in an HBO film.

Netflix's political series "House of Cards" earned a nomination for best TV drama, while Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright were nominated for their acting in the series. With the release of its inaugural season in February, "House of Cards" represented Netflix's first foray into TV programming.

Another Netflix series, "Orange is the New Black," earned Taylor Schilling a nomination for best drama actress. Finally, Jason Bateman earned a comedy nomination for the Netflix remake of "Arrested Development."

Starz often finds its original programming overlooked, but broke through this year with its films "Dancing on the Edge" and "White Queen."

Don Cheadle of "House of Lies" will try for a second straight Golden Globe as a TV comedy actor, competing with Bateman, Jim Parsons of "The Big Bang Theory" and Andy Samberg of "Brooklyn Nine Nine." Sentimental favorite Michael J. Fox, whose NBC show hasn't been doing well in the ratings, earned an acting nomination for his work.

The best showing for the commercial broadcast networks, which were completely shut out of the awards given out earlier this year, came in the best comedy category. There, CBS' "The Big Bang Theory," ABC's "Modern Family," NBC's "Parks and Recreation" and Fox's "Brooklyn Nine Nine" will compete with last year's winner, HBO's "Girls."

Zoey Deschanel of Fox's "New Girl" was nominated for best actor in a comedy, along with last year's winner, Lena Dunham of "Girls." Edie Falco of "Nurse Jackie," Julia Louis-Dreyfus of "Veep" were also nominated, along with Amy Poehler of "Parks and Recreation," who is co-hosting the Golden Globes with Tina Fey.

Louis-Dreyfus actualy earned two nominations — one for "Veep" and one for best actress in a movie comedy for "Enough Said."

PBS' "Downton Abbey" joins "Breaking Bad" and "House of Cards" as best drama nominees, along with CBS' "The Good Wife" and Showtime's new "Masters of Sex."

Cranston and Spacey will compete for best drama actor with James Spader, whose NBC series "The Blacklist" has been a hit in its rookie season. Michael Sheen of "Masters of Sex" and Liev Schreiber of "Ray Donovan" also earned acting nods.

The best drama actress category sets up a competition between two big network shows — Julianna Margulies of "The Good Wife" and Kerry Washington of "Scandal" — with the Netflix stars Schilling and Wright, and Tatiana Maslany of "Orphan Black."

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