published Sunday, March 3rd, 2013

Educate yourself when changing career paths

If you’re looking to start a career — whether it’s because you’re just beginning your journey as a working adult or because you’re ready for a change in life — you should know that the process is much larger than just getting a degree and looking for a job.

A career involves knowing your interests in a particular industry or area, knowing what to expect as far as compensation and responsibility and researching what tools and knowledge you will need to be an asset for companies in that industry. It’s wise to begin your pursuit by educating yourself on what careers are in demand and what skills you need to enter those careers.

Here are few simple steps that can help get you started:

Understand your interests: Some colleges and universities offer prospective and current students complimentary self-assessment options to help determine careers that fit their interests.

Understand employer needs: Knowing what jobs will keep your interest going strong is a good start, but it’s also important to learn what employers need from workers in that field so you can take the right college courses and learn the appropriate skills. You also should learn what jobs are in demand in your field of interest, so you can assess whether your career of choice offers room to enter and grow.

Understand educational needs: Starting a new career often involves the need to return to school for a new degree so you can be more competitive when entering the job market.

Understand your financial responsibilities: Schools will provide information on financial obligations and options, helping potential students determine if starting or going back to school is a viable option at the moment.

— BrandPoint

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