For 30 minutes Tuesday, the City Council chambers sounded more like a music hall than a legislative meeting place.

Chattanooga's proposed sound ordinance was supposed to fix — or at least offer a legal solution to — the noise complaints associated with the popular music venue Track 29.

Like a kid ordering a new flavor of ice cream, Chattanooga police tried something new this weekend.

The city’s poor say they need housing and the Chattanooga Housing Authority says it wants to provide it.

Even though 63 percent of voting Chattanoogans overturned the city's domestic partner ordinance in Thursday's election, events playing out on the national stage could make their preference moot.

All that stands in the way of Chattanooga city Chief of Staff Travis R. McDonough and a federal judgeship is a background check and the U.S. Senate, but neither should provide much resistance.

Chattanooga city attorneys asked the City Council on Tuesday to decide if 13 revisions should be made to the sound ordinance by casting what appeared to be a secret vote.

Chattanooga City Council voted 8-1 to approve a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes, or PILOT, agreement for developers building housing downtown.

A cascade of new public and private deals to bolster shopping, dining and entertainment venues in downtown Chattanooga has boosted hopes for a second renaissance in the core of the Scenic City.

Payment-in-lieu-of-taxes, or PILOT, agreements are a favorite tool for attracting investments and jobs from companies like Volkswagen, Coca-Cola and Chattem.

A push by the service workers union to raise Chattanooga employees' wages has led to a campaign by garbage collectors, sewage workers, librarians and others that now has the attention of City Hall.

There’s one sure-fire way to make the new leaders at the Chattanooga Police Department laugh, and it’s not a knock-knock joke.

A swelling crowd Tuesday night supported a move at the Chattanooga City Council in support of revamping the city's sound ordinance to breathe new life into the music and entertainment options downtown.

If people in Chattanooga do nothing to prevent the mentally ill from going to jail, the city will end up like larger cities across the country where jails become unequipped caregivers.

The divide between Miller Plaza, the red-brick courtyard and attached pavilion in the core of Chattanooga's city center, and Miller Park is five lanes of traffic on M.L. King Boulevard.

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