The Chattanooga Police Department took the first step this week toward completely revamping its recruiting, promotion and internal transfer policies.

Patrick Jackson graduated cum laude from a Memphis community college, earned certifications in technology and videography, but believes that a 5-year-old drug conviction still prevents him from getting a job.

The Chattanooga City Council has given its first blessing on a controversial noise ordinance, and some music venues in the city's downtown and South Side may be able to keep the music playing — with the appropriate permits.

Chattanoogans aren't being robbed as much as they used to be.

The Chattanooga Police Department will start annually checking all employees for outstanding warrants and the status of their driver's licenses after discovering that one patrol officer was driving on a suspended driver's license.

A $2.6 million taxpayer-funded project is under way to digitize hundreds of thousands of city records — a project that Mayor Andy Berke's staff says will increase government transparency and efficiency.

Yellow police tape and handcuffs were replaced with hot dogs and lemonade at the East Lake Courts on Saturday evening.

Chattanooga police are hoping that community members can do what police can't.

Hundreds of East Chattanooga residents want jobs, but their chances of getting hired to help demolish the vacated Harriet Tubman housing site are slim.

For 30 minutes Tuesday, the City Council chambers sounded more like a music hall than a legislative meeting place.

Chattanooga's proposed sound ordinance was supposed to fix — or at least offer a legal solution to — the noise complaints associated with the popular music venue Track 29.

Like a kid ordering a new flavor of ice cream, Chattanooga police tried something new this weekend.

The city’s poor say they need housing and the Chattanooga Housing Authority says it wants to provide it.

Even though 63 percent of voting Chattanoogans overturned the city's domestic partner ordinance in Thursday's election, events playing out on the national stage could make their preference moot.

All that stands in the way of Chattanooga city Chief of Staff Travis R. McDonough and a federal judgeship is a background check and the U.S. Senate, but neither should provide much resistance.

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