Joe Bryan, vice president of the Charleston/Calhoun/Hiwassee Historical Society, told members during a cemetery visit Sunday how the cemetery in Calhoun, surrounding the current First Baptist Church, began in 1819, the year the Cherokees ceded the land to the United States. Travelers still needed an American passport to cross the Hiwassee River into what is now Bradley County because they were leaving the country.
Joe Bryan, vice president of the Charleston/Calhoun/Hiwassee Historical Society, told members during a cemetery visit Sunday how the cemetery in Calhoun, surrounding the current First Baptist Church, began in 1819, the year the Cherokees ceded the land to the United States. Travelers still needed an American passport to cross the Hiwassee River into what is now Bradley County because they were leaving the country.
Photo by Randall Higgins /Chattanooga Times Free Press .
published Monday, April 16th, 2012
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CALHOUN, Tenn. -- Their grave markers read like an American history book with some of the pages missing.

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