A wireless device that can be connected to a home phone for service is seen inside Robert Post's home, in Mantoloking, N.J., which was flooded during Superstorm Sandy last year. Post has a pacemaker that needs to be checked once a month by phone, but the  phone company refuses to restore the area's landlines after they were damaged by the storm. Verizon doesn't want to replace washed-away lines and waterlogged underground cables because phone lines are outdated, it says. Meanwhile, the company is offering the wireless device, but the system does not work with pacemakers or fax machines.
A wireless device that can be connected to a home phone for service is seen inside Robert Post's home, in Mantoloking, N.J., which was flooded during Superstorm Sandy last year. Post has a pacemaker that needs to be checked once a month by phone, but the phone company refuses to restore the area's landlines after they were damaged by the storm. Verizon doesn't want to replace washed-away lines and waterlogged underground cables because phone lines are outdated, it says. Meanwhile, the company is offering the wireless device, but the system does not work with pacemakers or fax machines.
Photo by Associated Press /Chattanooga Times Free Press .
published Monday, July 8th, 2013
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The number of U.S. phone lines peaked at 186 million in 2000. Since then, more than 100 million copper lines have already been disconnected, according to trade group US Telecom.

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