Kevin rejoined the Times Free Press in August 2011 as the Southeast Tennessee K-12 education reporter. He worked as an intern in 2009, covering the communities of Signal Mountain, Red Bank, Collegedale and Lookout Mountain, Tenn.

A native Kansan, Kevin graduated with bachelor's degrees in journalism and sociology from the University of Kansas. After graduating, he worked as an education reporter in Hutchinson, Kan., for a year before coming back to Chattanooga.

Honors include a Kansas Associated Collegiate Press First Place Award for series writing, a Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence award for in-depth reporting, as well as a statewide education award for reporting on the school finance crisis in Kansas.

Kevin is always open to hearing your story ideas or tips and can be reached at (423) 757-6249 or khardy@timesfreepress.com.

Recent Stories »

After filing a lawsuit on Friday, Hamilton County School officials have countered a city offer to make reparations for years of unpaid liquor taxes.

After filing a lawsuit on Friday, Hamilton County School officials have countered a city offer to make reparations for years of unpaid liquor taxes.

When Stephen Livesay looks at Bryan College, he sees a Christ-centered campus on the move, "solid" in almost every way.

With talks stalled and a potential change in state law threatening the mounting tab owed to the Hamilton County school system over past-due liquor taxes, school officials filed a lawsuit against Chattanooga on Friday as a safeguard.

DAYTON, Tenn. — If we want to solve our country's problems, we should look to each other, not to the nation's capital.

The Hamilton County school board has filed a lawsuit in Chancery Court seeking nearly $12 million in past due liquor taxes from the city of Chattanooga, school board Chairman Mike Evatt said.

KNOXVILLE -- Two of Tennessee's favorite religions will collide next fall — faith and football — as the Tennessee Volunteers take on Utah State in a Sunday football game for the first time in a decade.

NASHVILLE — School districts that own their own school buses may get some relief as a new bill approved by the Tennessee General Assembly will allow school buses to stay on the road longer.

Think of it like the “The Magic School Bus,” just with less magic and more science.

Complaints from parents. Repeated reprimands. Meetings with HR. Written and oral warnings.

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