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Mark Wiedmer

Stories by Mark

They are who we've always thought they are ... pure class. What else needs to be said after Atlanta Braves legends Bobby Cox, Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux were all inducted into the Hall of Fame on Sunday?

KIMBALL, Tenn. — At least the kid was honest.

Deftly stacked atop Vanderbilt baseball coach Tim Corbin's office desk, the pile of handwritten letters and printed-out emails has grown to almost a foot tall, each one a thank-you note for the school's first national championship in a men's sport.

A few minutes after noon last Friday, Grace Academy athletic director Les Compton scanned his eyes across his school's basketball court filled with dozens of boys and girls of all ages, all of them sporting happy faces.

Since he has eaten close to 80 hot dogs and visited nearly 60 major and minor league ballparks since April 12, you'd think the last thing Tom Lohr would want to do before rating the tubesteaks at AT&T Field on Monday night was to sample similar fare elsewhere in our fair city.

It was Friday afternoon at GPS's indoor tennis courts, the rain playing soft jazz on the roof, Signal Mountain's Emily Hangstefer having just secured the United States women a spot in Saturday's World Deaf Team Tennis Championship gold-medal round.

When you think of combinations that don't often mix well, jocks and cops typically are up there with liver and ice cream, Chuck Fleischmann and Weston Wamp, Alabama and Auburn.

One-hundred and sixty miles to the southwest, at the Southeastern Conference's annual football media event, they've spent much of this week discussing and dissecting the schools every young player reportedly wants to play for. At least almost every young player.

When Cody Godfrey deftly birdied the 18th hole at The Honors Course on Monday, he had every reason to believe his 3-over-par 75 would qualify the former Tennessee Wesleyan golfer for Wednesday's Southern Amateur main draw.

East Hamilton seventh-grader Madison Hayes didn't just reach the Pitch, Hit & Run finals during Monday's All-Star Game festivities at Target Field in Minneapolis.

Madison Hayes certainly hopes she wins her 12-under age group's top prize during today's Pitch, Hit & Run competition at Minneapolis's Target Field prior to tonight's Home Run Derby on ESPN.

Fifteen teams; 982 swimmers. Eighty events spanning 10 age groups, boys and girls. Two states.

South Beach or South Russell? Bikinis or blankets? Surfboards or snow shovels?

When the Tennessee Sports Writers Association asked me a few months ago to inform Roy Exum that he'd been elected to its Hall of Fame, my first thought was, "He's not already in it?"

The news out of the University of Miami on Tuesday had to sound disturbingly familiar to the football fans of Vanderbilt University and Calhoun (Ga.) High School.

Roger Federer tried to hold it in Sunday afternoon.

Will Wade didn't study with great detail Indiana University's recently announced student-athlete "bill of rights."

A sports writing idol of mine once wrote that the only reason futbol was more popular throughout the rest of the world than our American football was because most of the rest of the world couldn't afford to equip its youngsters with helmets and shoulder pads and such.

It's been easy to forget about Wimbledon in this country over the past week. Especially with our United States soccer team performing so much better in the World Cup than our Red, White and Blue tennis players did at the All-England Club.

"If you want to find the truth, the truth is there in the transcripts."

Could it be that we've been too hard on these Atlanta Braves? Could it be they deserve far more cheers than jeers?

Joe Goodman still is not sure his 63-year-old eyes will believe what they're seeing this afternoon at the Chattanooga Waterfront Triathlon when his 34-year-old law partner David Callahan completes his 52nd triathlon in 52 weeks.

Check out the latest edition on NBADraft.net and you'll find former University of Tennessee post player Jarnell Stokes going to Philadelphia with the 47th overall pick in tonight's NBA draft.

Stupid stoppage time.

"You got Triple-A, Double-A, Single-A ... then you get down to independent ball ... then you get down to the Pecos League ... where you get paid a dollar-nineteen ..."

I'm going to do something today I never previously thought was possible.

Like many of us who want our basketball to resemble poetry in motion, Vanderbilt men's coach Kevin Stallings was pretty much in awe of the San Antonio Spurs' dismantling of the former two-time defending champion Miami Heat in the NBA Finals.

The first one through Engel Stadium's black iron gates Monday evening, Bob Mulkey last called Chattanooga home in 1985. But that didn't stop him from leaving his Huntsville, Ala., residence in time to reach Engel before 4:30 on a toasty afternoon more reminiscent of August than June.

CLEVELAND, Tenn. — Even for the guy who authored the infamous line "You can't spell 'Citrus' without a U and a T,' it seemed an unusually cruel tease.

Maury Wills was 10 years old. He had no shoes on his feet. His baseball glove was actually a brown paper bag he'd pounded a pocket into to help snare ground balls.

The San Antonio Spurs don't do hype and self-promotion.

When it comes to former UCLA basketball star Ed O'Bannon's antitrust suit against the NCAA, everyone wants to blame the adults.

The 2005 NCAA championship game had just ended, North Carolina nipping Illinois for the crown. Out on the court inside St. Louis's Edward Jones Dome, UNC guard Rashad McCants lifted high his jersey, baring his torso for everyone inside the dome, if not the entire country.

Nobody likes a sore loser. Especially when he drags handicapped children into his arguments.

Maybe the subject will come up during this week's U.S. Open golf tournament coverage and maybe it won't. Course records usually aren't a part of the conversation during Open week.

I was a spectator at Churchill Downs the last time a racehorse won the Kentucky Derby on its way to the Triple Crown.

Buddy Curry understands the problem.

Only Nick Saban could turn a two-game losing streak into a $1-million-a-year raise.

Older than dirt.

Hey, Mark Emmert. Still think you're in charge of the NCAA?

You might reasonably think it's been fairly easy being Dale Earnhardt's kid. Well, except for watching his dad killed on the final lap of the 2001 Daytona 500. And the divorce that his parents went through. And all those outrageous expectations from the Intimidator's fans for the kid to follow in Pop's footsteps.

Like most other folks with past or current ties to Soddy-Daisy High School softball, former Lady Trojans coach Clifford Kirk knows exactly where he'll be at 7 o'clock tonight.

Three days from today — Saturday — is the deadline to apply online for tickets to the 2015 NCAA Men's Final Four in Indianapolis. But for all those hoping to buy up to four ticket books (semifinals and final) for $190 apiece through the lottery format, Ringgold's David Miller has two important words of caution: Buyer, beware.

Mike Lane and his daughter Mary Alice pitched their tent at the corner of S. Forrest Avenue and Scenic Highway atop Lookout Mountain around 10 a.m. Monday. A victim of cystic fibrosis, Mary Alice hoped to raise a few dollars to help find a cure.

The twin towers terrifyingly tumbling to earth in his hometown, the whole world suddenly a very scary place, Freddie de los Santos was instantly determined to make amends.

Mike Skiles makes his living selling bicycles.

The rest of the NBA had to breathe a sigh of relief Tuesday night over the Cleveland Cavaliers winning the top pick in the league’s draft lottery.

New Tennessee basketball coach Donnie Tyndall insists his team is not yet up to agreeing to play a home-and-home series with UT-Chattanooga.

Around 9 o'clock tonight, Fred Sturdivant will position himself in front of the television for the start of the NBA Western Conference finals between San Antonio and Oklahoma City, intent on studying the OKC player he hopes to become — Kevin Durant.

Read between the lines in the accompanying story by Stephen Hargis and it seems all but inevitable that the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association's public and private high schools are headed for an irrevocable split, some never to meet again on an athletic field or court.

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