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Yolanda Putman

Stories by Yolanda

At 11 a.m. the deacons walked into the sanctuary singing an old gospel hymn in perfect harmony. No music.

Any developer who takes over the former Harriet Tubman site should have to sign a community benefits agreement holding the developer accountable for hiring residents and making sure residents benefit from the development, the People’s Coalition for Affordable Housing says.

A group of senior East Lake Courts residents is taking a stand against crime, saying they will call the police when they see illegal activity and they are not intimidated by threats of retaliation.

The Chattanooga Rail Runners, the city’s only professional basketball team, will have its first game at the Rossville Athletic Center this weekend.

Sounds of classic jazz and the smell of sweet, smoked barbecue made me smile the moment I entered Chattanooga Wing Factory.

Chattanooga Housing Authority board members have at least three bids to consider for the purchase of the former Harriet Tubman housing site, the Times Free Press has learned.

A neighborhood coalition wants federal prosecutors to investigate the Chattanooga Housing Authority for a bidding process that for two years has failed to sell the city's second-largest public housing site.

Chattanooga leaders saw the civil rights era bombings in Birmingham, Ala., and high-pressure water hoses turned on people in Montgomery, Ala., and said such events would not happen here, according to former NAACP President Eddie Holmes.

Retired Harlem Globetrotter Paul "Showtime" Gaffney thinks he's taking a winning shot at helping local athletes reach their potential at his Sports University.

Residents in the city's four public housing sites for the elderly aired grievances over new temperature restrictions in their apartments, but housing officials promised to work to make sure they're comfortable.

If the Meals on Wheels program had more volunteers, it could feed more residents who can't cook for themselves, program manager Stacie Smith said.

Jamar Rogers survived homelessness, prostitution, methamphetamine abuse and an HIV diagnosis.

A new East Chattanooga neighborhood group clamored on Saturday for the city to buy the derelict Harriet Tubman public housing complex, though most members said they don't support Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke's current plan for the site.

The Chattanooga Regional Homeless Coalition will complete its annual Point-in-Time count of homeless people today in hopes of generating at least $2.8 million in funding to serve them.

Public housing residents say being in a room where an outside party regulates the heat is like sitting behind the steering wheel while someone else drives the car.

Terry Moore Smith owes more than $1,000 from heating her three-bedroom home in November and December and is seeking help to pay it.

Chattanooga may get another 80 units of affordable housing within the next year.

Former state Rep. Tommie Brown, keynote speaker for Chattanooga's Martin Luther King Day events Monday, says she wants to have a work session on the lessons learned between passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 and today.

The United Way knows how to get toddlers ready for kindergarten and wants to share its information at no charge with every preschool teacher who wants to learn.

About two dozen people gathered Thursday at Second Missionary Baptist Church to brainstorm solutions to crime in their community.

Chattanooga housing officials have turned down a third requested extension of time for a Chicago-based group to purchase the former Harriet Tubman housing development, and one city official said the city still is interested in the site.

The Chicago-based Lakewood Realty Group doesn’t have the $2.8 million that it promised to purchase the Harriet Tubman public housing site.

Rose White has lived in her Fairington Circle home for nearly three years, but she never received a $500 EPB bill until this month.

At ages 24 and 28, Teal Thibaud and Katherine Currin founded a nonprofit that has generated more than a half-million dollars in grant funding to revitalize an East Chattanooga community that many developers and urban planners dismissed.

Despite public opposition, the Chattanooga Housing Authority is expected to close on the sale of the city's second largest public housing site to Lakewood Realty Group on Jan. 15.

As freezing temperatures set in, the largest emergency shelter in Chattanooga is struggling to find staff and volunteers to operate.

The NAACP is working diligently to bridge the gap between people who fought in the civil rights movement and those whose lives involve Twitter, FaceBook and Instagram, said Vincent Phipps, chairman of ACT-SO, the organization's high school outreach program.

The Chattanooga Housing Authority is installing regulators that will prevent public housing residents from setting thermostats higher than 75 degrees in the winter and lower than 70 in the summer.

Some children in Avondale see people who have been shot and are still lying in the street bleeding while they walk to the school bus stop, Chris Rolle said.

A college professor with a doctorate nearly drank and drugged himself to death after his mother died.

After so much negative publicity about blacks in Chattanooga in recent weeks, I am thrilled to do a review of Greg’s Southern Soul Food restaurant.

Elizabeth "Caitlin" Puckett is too sick to leave the hospital for Christmas, so a dog and law enforcement officers with the Unwanted Motorcycle Club came to visit her Tuesday at Erlanger's Children's Hospital on Christmas Eve.

Chattanooga Police Patrolman Johnny Wright didn't have to look for the address when he answered a "drunk and disorderly" call on Flynn Street, an alley off M.L. King Boulevard. The yelling was so loud he knew exactly where to go.

Giving comes so naturally to Mary McSears that seeing her help others makes people want to join her.

Shannon and Bradley Taylor moved from Ohio to Chattanooga to be near his mother, who needed surgery, and other family members in Tennessee and Atlanta. The couple and their 1-year-old grandson slept in a car and then at the Chattanooga Rescue Mission for five days before getting into Family Promise of Chattanooga.

An African-American cultural center that is home to more than a century of Dalton history faces closure, but a host of volunteer board members and staff are doing all they can to keep it open.

A lecture hall full of middle- and high-school girls listened Thursday as a Girls Preparatory School graduate said she's among the 11 percent of women in the nation with careers in engineering, one of the fastest-growing and highest-paid fields in the country.

Americans lead the world in illegal drug use, even though most illegal drugs come from outside the country.

Families that need toys for their children should call the United Way's 211 center no later than Dec. 13 to participate in its Christmas Clearance, where more than two dozen agencies help make kids' holidays sparkle.

A year ago, Monyette Ervin faced a questionable future. After supporting herself for more than 30 years, debilitating back pain left the former nursing home employee unable to work and in danger of losing her home.

Every December, rent collections fall off at the Chattanooga Housing Authority.

Six months pregnant with her second child, Casey Sullivan figured that all of her discomfort, bulging neck veins, coughing and back pain were a result of her pregnancy. So she didn't bring it to her doctor's attention until she couldn't breathe.

It's been nearly two years since Dr. Tommie F. Brown was dethroned as a longtime state representative by JoAnne Favors, but Brown said she doesn't intend to stop serving her community.

More than 62,000 people in Chattanooga live in food deserts, yet in some neighborhoods as few as five people take advantage of a grocery store on wheels that comes to them once a week.

Good-paying jobs, a solid support network and meaningful education would help keep men from committing crimes, said many attending an NAACP meeting Tuesday night.

When Tonya Rooks moved into public housing, she paid about $50 for rent. Within 18 months she landed a full-time job as a recruiter with First Things First and chose to pay a flat-rate rent of $447 a month, instead of 30 percent of her income.

Roger Hilley said it was hard to call the YMCA's Joe Smith and admit that he had no place else to go, but the high school senior said Smith was his brightest path to a better life. Smith let Hilley escape his environment of drugs and instability to sleep on the couch in his home for three months.

Organizers of the Chattanooga Autism Center's first fundraising walk said they expect about 1,000 participants to come out Saturday to raise money and awareness about autism.

Having just $4.40 a day to spend on food changes things. Angela Ballard thinks about food a lot more now.

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