MocTastic's comment history

MocTastic said...

Hey Butchjomo11, with each UTK win, is Butch more likely to be wearing blue/maize than orange/white next year?

Mocs were winners, doesn't it feel great to win?

Hank.

November 17, 2014 at 10:16 a.m.
MocTastic said...

Okay, you Chattanooga peeps. Can you remember the first thing aired on ESPN in Chattanooga? I was eagerly awaiting it. It was a replay of an NCAA (I don't know if it was NCAA sanctioned, but it was two college teams) table tennis match. Set there and watched it, amazed we had a sports station 24 hours a day.

JG like your use of the royal prounoun "we". :)

November 13, 2014 at 2:51 p.m.
MocTastic said...

Stewwie I think its alot of societal things pushing blacks to football and basketball and away from sports like baseball, golf, tennis, etc.

JF I think tournament brackets also really exploded with two things, neither of them being NC State. One, the lesser, being the expansion to 64 teams, which happened in 1985, not long after NC State, but more importantly, the invention of the internet. The internet, fantasy leagues and the like have exploded things like NCAA bb tournament brackets into the stratosphere. That would be the early to mid 90s. To me the Larry Magic game was much more hyped than the NC State game and the Texas Western game had all the societal implications that neither of these two games had.

I think you hit the nail on the head though, the NC St game was one of the first big games you remember from your youth, but trust us old farts, the big games existed before then. I am guessing you dont' remember the Lew Alcindor Elvin Hayes match up in 1968. It is called the Game of The Century and many peg that to the beginning of March Madness, while not being a tournament game itself, over 31,000 in the Astrodome. The first NCAA bb game broadcast nationwide in prime time. I am old enough to remember watching the game. NC State? Ah, okay...not really that big.

November 13, 2014 at 2:36 p.m.
MocTastic said...

Brandon Born and Shane Neal both stayed five years on scholarship with Born being good enough to make it late in the Denver Nuggets camp.

November 13, 2014 at 12:18 p.m.
MocTastic said...

Bryan Richardson didn't stay for four years, he transferred out to West Florida. We have one right now, Marty Bareika, in his fith year to answer your question. Oops, not American born. Baylor's Tim Parker was at UTC for five years, but I think if memory serves only on scholarship the last three or four years. The last one I can definitely say was on scholarship the whole time and played four years was David Phillips. We have had other kids who stayed four years but were walkons, such as Zach Ferrell. Lincoln Walters predated Phillips, only played three, but was on scholarship for four, redshirting one year. He will be back again coaching against us with Montreat. gomocs.com has the rosters all the way back to the early 70s on it. Used that to refresh my memory.

I want to say that games were played in Chattanooga Memorial Auditorium way back in the day. I remember the Globetrotters playing there in my youth.

I think I am going to start calling Jomo11 "Butch" when I see him in person, I suggest others do the same.

November 13, 2014 at 11:57 a.m.
MocTastic said...
November 13, 2014 at 11:33 a.m.
MocTastic said...

I applaud the money for cancer research, but I still do not buy into this Valvano crap that ESPN foists upon us every year. By getting sick and begging for money a coach who really should not be revered is somewhat given sainthood status. I suggest a good read of Personal Fouls, The Broken Promises and Shattered Dreams of Big Money Basketball at Jim Valvano's North Carolina State, by Peter Golenbock. Valvano was reportedly one of the worst in college sports exploiting the college student. I am not on the Valvano bandwagon. Valvano in his eight years had ONE player to graduate. Nuf Ced.

November 13, 2014 at 11:23 a.m.
MocTastic said...

What did NC St winning in 1983 change? With respect to NC St, they were decided underdogs in that game. However, if you go back and look at their season you will see something interesting. The ACC was in one of their first years trying the shot clock for conference games. NC State with and without the shot clock were two different teams. With the clock they were not as good as without it. In the NCAA tournament Valvano was able to control the pace of the game, with no shot clock, and keep all the games close. I really think many people overlooked this while betting, which is what moves the lines back and forth.

I hate trying to change history. SuperBowl III is really SuperBowl I. The first two were not called the SuperBowl, therefore they weren't. We could all agree to start calling JG Jay Horsefeathers, but that doesn't make it so, he is JG.

A game changing play first occured in Chattanooga per historical reports. It changed the way basketball is played.

There are some arguments if it was truly first debuted in Chattanooga, but many sources say the "pivot play" was first seen in Chattanooga. YOu can read about it here:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1755&dat=19790426&id=oHUjAAAAIBAJ&sjid=lmcEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6507,5294546

RIP Murray. At the last UTC basketball reunion Murray made it to I got to spend a few minutes talking to him. The topic came around to his recruiting class of Nick Morken, Russ Schoene, Willie White, Stanford Stricklin, and Donnell Cochran. He was proud to let me know that in that class he had four UTC Hall of Famers and three NBA draft picks, White/Morken/Schoene. He smiled at me and said that not only did he sign three NBA draft picks that year, but that two of them were white! Of course, the following season we signed Gerald Wilkins. That was some great recruiting.

November 13, 2014 at 11:05 a.m.
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