published Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Downtown Knoxville rally seeks to decrease size of drug-free school zones

Maurice Clark and Malik Hardin, front right, lead a rally by One Nation by Conviction to try and gain signatures to repeal the Drug Free School Zone Act, Thursday, March 28, 2013. The group walked from Market Square to the Howard Baker Jr. Federal Courthouse. The law increases penalties for illegal drug-related activities in drug-free school zones. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)
Maurice Clark and Malik Hardin, front right, lead a rally by One Nation by Conviction to try and gain signatures to repeal the Drug Free School Zone Act, Thursday, March 28, 2013. The group walked from Market Square to the Howard Baker Jr. Federal Courthouse. The law increases penalties for illegal drug-related activities in drug-free school zones. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)
Photo by The Knoxville News Sentinel /Chattanooga Times Free Press.

KNOXVILLE — Approximately 70 people attended a rally and march in downtown Knoxville today to address the laws and punishments associated with Tennessee’s Drug Free School Zone Act.

The organization One Nation By Conviction, led by Maurice Clark, is protesting the increased punishment handed down to drug offenders within a school zone. The law currently states that anyone within 1,000 feet of a school is subject to harsher sentences.

“We’re not saying that they should be able to break the law and get away with it,” Clark said today at the rally. “We’re just saying that they’re breaking the law, but they’re gone for longer periods than the law broken really justifies.”

Read more at Knoxnews.com.

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